Mt Kisco Nutritionist Makes Link Between Infertility And Diet

Inability to get pregnant can sometimes qualify in certain individuals as something of a medical mystery - especially for the couple trying to do so. On the other hand, the intervention of a professional can yield both answers and the offspring they so desire. Whether they go the traditional medical route, enlist someone like Mt. Kisco nutritionist Dina Khader or both, the thyroid is among the first thing that is checked, according to Ms. Khader. Having an under active thyroid is a very common cause of infertility, she says.


Inability to get pregnant can sometimes qualify in certain individuals as something of a medical mystery - especially for the couple trying to do so. On the other hand, the intervention of a professional can yield both answers and the offspring they so desire.

Whether they go the traditional medical route, enlist someone like Mt. Kisco nutritionist Dina Khader or both, the thyroid is among the first thing that is checked, according to Ms. Khader. Having an under active thyroid is a very common cause of infertility, she says.

In response, their doctor can prescribe synthroid to up the odds of

conception, but poor nutritional intake can also detract from the desired outcome. Any food that contains glutton like barley, wheat or rye will aggravate the thyroid condition, she says.

Either way, her approach begins with a full accounting of their diet history. To start, many women, she finds, are lacking in proper protein and vitamin intake. With that important omission, she says, "You're much less likely to have good quality eggs and it's all about the eggs."

Another common cause of fertility problems is a shortage of healthy fats that can be found in foods such as virgin olive oil, peanuts and avocados. "You need fat for healthy hormone production," she says.

The anti-oxidents we all hear so much about also play an expected role. Consuming healthy doses of fruit, vegetables or green tea is going to help your immunity and keep you healthier, she says, and it pays off in both the fertility stage and in the actual pregnancy.

Less commonly considered, but just as important, is the role of zinc. Easily tested for in any of the local labs, she says, in every case where she’s seen


low levels of zinc, infertility has gone hand and hand.

Overall, her prescription is to undue unhealthy habits, and the deficiencies that can go with them, a three month head start to make up ground before trying to get pregnant. But unlike many holistic approaches, she sees no problem with attacking the issue along with the traditional medical approaches.

This usually enhances what the doctors want them to do, she says. On the other hand, she highly recommends women do a healthy detox program with her to flush out any remaining prescribed hormones that commonly go with doctors orders.

But board certified, nutrition expert or just WebMD maven, stress is a factor that falls under common knowledge in regards to fertility problems. Add a bad diet to it and the stress levels are compounded. To actually verify in scientific terms, she says, “You can measure cortisol in the blood and urine and that will tells us how much stress is going on in that particular person.”

In men, she says, “stress destroys sperm,” and zinc matters on Mars too. Zinc is important for sperm quantity and quality, she says, and the pesticides found on non-organic food also has a detrimental effect, she adds.

Making sure, they give it at least a year, and as long as there’s nothing structurally wrong with a person, while they also pursue the medical end, she says, she can boast a 70-75% success rate. “We’ve had outstanding results,” she concludes. 



Article Written By richmonetti

I write and quite well

Last updated on 02-06-2016 2K 0

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